Litters Available & Stud Dogs

 

If you would like your Litter or Stud Dog added to the register please contact the LCGB Club secretary and provide the necessary Hip, Elbow, Eye and LPN1 Gene Test paperwork to enable your litter or stud to be added to the list.

 

 

Click on this link to visit the Leonberger Stud Book, for Pedigrees and Health Information

 

 

ENSURE YOU BUY A PUPPY FROM A REPUTABLE SOURCE.

 

Ask to see a pedigree before making any decision and ensure you receive it when you collect your puppy.

 

Check sire and dam’s hip and elbow scores, these should be shown to you and should fall within the Leonberger Club of Great Britain’s breeding code of ethics.

 

Ask if they have had the relevant eye checks and again, look at the certificates yourself. Also check the LPN1 certificates.

 

Ask for a recommended diet. Many breeders will also provide you with a starter pack of puppy food so that the pup’s diet is not changed suddenly when it leaves for it’s new home.

 

Expect to get a health sheet that gives information on vaccinations, worming and other relevant health details.

 

Make sure you see the mother and look for a kind, tolerant temperament. It is also worthwhile to meet and assess other immediate relatives where possible.

 

Expect to receive a puppy that has some form of permanent identification, either a tattoo or microchip, which ensures its identity can always be checked.

 

Discuss the health and attributes of your pup’s ancestors; does the breeder know what is behind them?

 

Ask for advice!!

 

If in doubt take someone along who has some sound knowledge of dogs.

 

Never buy a puppy from a pet store.

 

Never buy a puppy if you have not seen where and how it was raised.

 

Never buy a puppy that appears sickly, shy, skinny or in any way unwell, no matter how hard it pulls at your heart. To do so only encourages the unscrupulous to carry on producing puppies under unwholesome conditions.

ENSURE YOUR PUPPY HAS ITS FULL COURSE OF INOCULATIONS

 

This should be done as early as possible. Most breeders will advise you to take your new pup and register them with your own vet to be checked over as soon as you can. Discuss vaccination procedures with your vet.   The Guide Dogs for the Blind have built up a great deal of experience with this over the last few decades and are confident that it is perfectly acceptable to give the first jab at six weeks although 7-8 is perfectly acceptable and is the norm within most vet practices. The follow-on jabs are usually scheduled for 2 weeks later. Check with your vet on their opinion on booster jabs.  This might vary depending on the area you live in.

ENSURE YOUR DOG IS REGULARLY WORMED AND GIVEN APPROPRIATE TREATMENT FOR FLEA INFESTATION.

 

Although the risks to humans of disease from worms are not as great as is often quoted, they certainly should not be dismissed as they can have a big impact on the quality of life for your new dog.  Also, fleas appear to be increasing as the weather pattern changes.

ENSURE YOU ALWAYS CARRY SOMETHING TO COLLECT ANY FAECES DEPOSITED BY YOUR DOG

 

This is the acceptable face of dog ownership!   Apart from the anti-social aspect of leaving mess everywhere it also gives the anti-dog people more ammunition.

 

ENSURE YOUR DOG ALWAYS WEARS IDENTIFICATION.

 

It is illegal for a dog to be out without a collar with an ID Disc on it.  This should have an address/phone number although one tip is not to put your dog’s name. Knowing a dog’s name often makes it easier to steal and dog theft is a growing problem. Even if it strays, it is surprising how many people are more tempted to keep a dog when they know its name.

ENSURE YOUR DOG IS SOCIABLE WITH HUMANS.

 

This is usually achieved by buying a puppy which is genetically sound for temperament and then socialising it as soon as possible.  If the dog has a doubtful temperament then do not allow him or her to get into situations where they can cause distress, or could be the cause of distress to others.  After all, this is your dog and you are totally responsible.

 

ENSURE YOUR DOG IS SOCIABLE WITH OTHER DOGS.

 

As above!  It is vital that your dog learns how to behave in the company of others of its kind. Early socialisation is the key to this.  If your dog does happen to enjoy the odd punch-up then it is a simple matter to keep it on a lead where there is a possibility of an altercation.  In extreme situations, simply put a muzzle on your dog as it is not worth taking any chances.

ENSURE THAT YOUR DOG, IRRESPECTIVE OF ITS AGE, IS NEVER LEFT ALONE WITH YOUNG CHILDREN

In cases of dogs ‘attacking’’ children in the home, the common factor in virtually every instance is that no adult was present.  We invariably do not know what prompted the incident and we would strongly advise that a young child and dog are NEVER left unsupervised by an adult no matter how much you trust your dog.

ENSURE YOU KEEP YOUR DOG ON A LEAD IN BUSY URBAN AREAS AND ANYWHERE WHERE THERE IS LIVESTOCK

 

Dogs will often behave unpredictably.  Even the most steady and well-behaved dog can suddenly give chase, run into the path of a vehicle, or pursue stock.  Oh, and another point- If walking your dog using a flexi-lead keep it tightly retracted when alongside a road.  Failure to keep your dog on a lead where there is livestock nearby could easily mean he receives both barrels of an irate farmers shot gun.

 

Finally

SERIOUSLY CONSIDER HAVING THIRD PARTY INSURANCE

 

I am afraid this is an absolute must in this day and age.  You should seriously consider being fully insured for damage or injury that your dog may be accused of perpetrating. We all know how readily people sue.   DO NOT ASSUME that you are covered by your house insurance for all cases!!

 

Whether a dog is for show, working or a pet -the same rules and responsibilities must apply.

 

Non KC Registered Puppies

 

Occasionally you may see litters for sale that have not been registered or are not going to be registered with the kennel club.

You may believe that because these litters are a fraction of the cost of a registered litter that you are going to 'bag a bargain'.

 

The LCGB strongly advise against buying a puppy from an unregistered litter.Why are the puppies unregistered? There are a number of possible reasons, most of which relate to the health and welfare of the parents.

 

Examples include: the mother is too young or too old to have puppies. One or both of the parents have temperament problems.The mother has had a previous litter within 12 months or has had more than 4 litters. Either or both of the parents have restrictions to breeding imposed by their breeders.

 

If either or both of the parents have restrictions this could mean that your potential puppy could develop or already have an hereditary condition.

This could mean at best vet bills and at worst the premature death of your puppy.Still think you have bagged a bargain?

 

 

 

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